Graduate Certificate in Corporate & Financial Services Law

Course Overview

The Graduate Certificate in Corporate & Financial Services Law (GCCFSL) is aimed at graduates with a law degree, who are seeking to upgrade their skills and knowledge as in-house legal counsel in the banking and finance sector or as corporate lawyers in local or international law firms.

This programme offers a wide selection of regular and intensive modules taught in Singapore by our own faculty members as well as visiting professors, who are top corporate and finance law practitioners and academics from around the world. It is conducted on a part-time basis and legal professionals have the flexibility to read a minimum of one 3-week intensive module or one regular 13-week module at 4, 5 or 8 modular credits (MC) per semester.  

Candidates who have not read and passed a general module in Company Law at NUS or its equivalent in a common law jurisdiction are required to read Elements of Company Law (4 modular credits). Candidates who have read and passed a general module in Company Law at NUS or its equivalent in a common law jurisdiction may apply for exemption.


Admission Requirements

Candidates will be admitted based on the following admission requirements:

» A good Bachelor’s degree in Law or its equivalent (eg. Juris Doctor)
» Minimum TOEFL iBT 100 / TOEFL paper-based score of 600-603 / IELTS 7.0, if Law degree was not in English.


Duration & Graduation Criteria

Candidates must pass all modules and successfully obtain a total of 12 to 15 modular credits (MCs) (generally 3 modules) within a maximum period of 36 months of their candidature in order to be awarded the GCCFSL.


Modes of Instruction & Course Duration

A semester-long module is a 36-hour course taught once a week over the course of 13 weeks from August to November (Semester One) and from January to April (Semester Two).

An intensive module is a 27-hour course taught intensively over 3 weeks and scheduled as follows:

Day Time
Monday 6:30pm - 9:30pm
Wednesday 6:30pm - 9:30pm
Friday 2:30pm - 5:30pm

The following are the periods when intensive modules are conducted in the Faculty:
 
Semester Weeks Weeks
Semester One Week 1 to 3 (August) Week 4 to 6 (September)
Semester Two Week 1 to 3 (January) Week 4 to 6 (February)

The examination and assessment of student performances in the programme will be conducted through various assessment modes such as class participation, assignments, research papers, take-home examinations and final examinations as stated in each module description. Students are encouraged to review the examination and assessment details for each module before opting for it.


List of Modules

The following modules are offered in AY2020-21:

Semester One

Compulsory
Course Description The company is one of the most important institutions in our society. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the main conceptual apparatus of company law and to analyse some of the policy issues raised in facilitating and regulating this pervasive commercial form. Topics include the following: corporate personality and limited liability; corporate organs, constitution and meetings; corporate capacity and contracting; corporate finance; corporate governance; shareholders' rights and remedies. The course uses Singapore's Companies Act (Cap 50) as a sample legislation. The course will focus on Singapore and will provide relevant comparisons on corporate law in China.
Course Convenor(s) Professor Hans Tjio
Modular Credits 4
Class Dates Tuesdays: 12.00nn to 3.00pm
Course Duration 10 August to 13 November 2020 
Modes of Assessment Class Participation - 20%
3-hr Take Home Exam - 80% [Release: Tue, 10 Nov 2020 (9am); Due: Tue, 10 Nov 2020 (12pm)]
Preclusion(s) NA
Prerequisite(s) NA


Electives
Course Description Advanced Contract Law invites students to examine selected topics from contract law in greater detail and conceptual depth. Questions include:
- What does contractual intention mean?
- Should the doctrine of consideration be abolished?
- Should promissory estoppel be a sword?
- What is the justification for mitigation and remoteness?
- What should be the aim of remedies for breach?
- Should account of profits be available?
- How should contracts be interpreted?
- When should terms be implied?
- Should substantive unfairness be controlled?
- How does and how should the law deal with change of circumstances?
- How should we understand the vitiating factors?
Course Convenor(s) Professor Mindy Chen-Wishart
Modular Credits 4
Class Dates Mondays (6.30pm to 9.30pm); Wednesdays (6.30pm to 9.30pm) & Fridays (2.30pm to 5.30pm)
Make-up class for Monday 10 August will be held on Wednesday, 19 August (1.00pm to 4.00pm)
Make-up class for Friday, 14 August will be held on Wednesday, 26 August (1.00pm to 4.00pm)
Course Duration 10 August to 28 August 2020 
Modes of Assessment Class Participation - 20%; Class Presentation - 20%; Research Paper (4000 words) - 60%
[Due: Date to be confirmed (9.00pm)]
Preclusion(s) Philosophical Foundations of Contract Law [LL4187/LL5187/LL6187;LL4187V/LL5187V/LL6187V]
Prerequisite(s) (a) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent; (b) Contract Law in a common law jurisdiction.
Course Description To provide law students who intend to read commercial law electives with a foundation in accounting, finance and other related business concepts. It covers topics such as interpretation and analysis of standard financial statements, the types of players and instruments in the financial markets and the basic framework of a business investment market. The course will employ a hypothetical simulation where lawyers advise on several proposals involving the acquisition and disposal of assets by a client. The issues covered in the hypothetical will include asset valuation models, financing options and techniques, and compliance with accounting and regulatory frameworks.
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Phua Lye Huat, Stephen
Adjunct Associate Professor Leong Chan Foo, James
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Mondays: 3.00pm to 6.00pm
Course Duration 10 August to 13 November 2020 
Modes of Assessment Tutorial: 10%; Quiz 1: 15%; Quiz 2: 20%; Individual Test: 20%; Research Project: 35%
Preclusion(s) Not opened to students who have taken or are taking Financial Accounting
(1) FNA1002;
(2) FNA1002E;
(3) FNA1002X;
(4) ACC1002X; ACC1002X NOTE:The following students are not permitted to enrol in this module: (1) those who have completed, or who intend in the current or a future semester to subscribe for, modules relating to finance or accounting offered in other universities or faculties in NUS (2) those who are graduates of, or are currently enrolled in other programmes leading to professional qualifications in, accountancy or finance.
Prerequisite(s) (a) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
(b) Company Law [LLB2008/LC2008] or its equivalent in a common law jurisdiction (may be taken concurrently).
Course Description This course examines the grant of credit and the taking of security. Two thirds of the course focuses on secured credit, and consists of a detailed examination of the system of taking security over personal property in Singapore. Formal security such as pledges, chattel mortgages, assignments of choses in action and company charges; as well as quasi-security devices such as retention of title and factoring, are analysed to assess their use and efficacy. Singapore's system of form over substance is examined in the context of international developments, in particular the enactment of comprehensive personal property security statutes in various jurisdictions which take a more functional approach. The remaining one third of the course discusses forms of lending, ranging from unsecured loans by moneylenders to bank loans, overdrafts and syndicated loans. 
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Neo Swee Suan, Dora
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Tuesdays: 12.00nn to 3.00pm
Course Duration 10 August to 13 November 2020 
Modes of Assessment Final Exam - 75% & Written Assignment - 25%
Preclusion(s) Not open to students who have taken or are taking Secured Transactions Law [LL4148/LL5148/LL6148]
Prerequisite(s) (a) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
(b) Company Law or its equivalent in a common law jurisdiction (may be taken concurrently).
Course Description This course examines the grant of credit and the taking of security. Two thirds of the course focuses on secured credit, and consists of a detailed examination of the system of taking security over personal property in Singapore. Formal security such as pledges, chattel mortgages, assignments of choses in action and company charges; as well as quasi-security devices such as retention of title and factoring, are analysed to assess their use and efficacy. Singapore's system of form over substance is examined in the context of international developments, in particular the enactment of comprehensive personal property security statutes in various jurisdictions which take a more functional approach. The remaining one third of the course discusses forms of lending, ranging from unsecured loans by moneylenders to bank loans, overdrafts and syndicated loans.
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Lee Tye Beng, Joel & Mr Teo Wei Ren, Marcus
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Wednesdays (9.00am to 12.00nn)
Course Duration 12 August to 4 November 2020
Modes of Assessment Class Participation - 30% & Final Exam - 70%
Preclusion(s) Not open to anyone who has done: LL4030V/LL5030V/LL6030V; LL4030/LL5030/LL6030 International Commercial Litigation; LL4049V/LL5049V/LL6049V; LL4049/LL5049/LL6049 Principles of Conflict of Laws; LL4205V/LL5205V/LL6205V; LL4205/LL5205/LL6205 Maritime Conflict of Laws at NUS Law, or a substantially similar course elsewhere.
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
Course Description The course includes various aspects of financial regulation. The focus is on the regulation of banks and the role of central banks. Other forms of regulation of financial intermediaries and financial markets are discussed as well, but in less detail. Since the focus is on banks, it is important for students to understand what distinguishes them from other providers of financial services and how the regulatory approaches differ.

The part on the regulation of banks covers the requirements for their authorization, the principles of prudential regulation and rescue concepts in situations of insolvency and default. These aspects are discussed from a comparative perspective with the Basel requirements at the core of the discussion, complemented by the implementing norms in important jurisdictions, above all in Singapore. Around the globe, national legislators and regulators have implemented the FSB Key Attributes for the resolution and restructuring of financial institutions, and the course looks at Singapore's and Hong Kong's rules in detail. The roles of central banks form a further core part of the course. Their tasks and objectives are studied from a comparative perspective. Their essential role in crisis management, their co-operation with supervisory agencies and their monetary policy are the main components of this part of the course.

Pre-recorded videos and readings are the homework components preparing students for in-class discussions. In addition, students work in small groups on supervised research and present their results to the rest of the course. A short in-class quiz tests students' understanding of bank regulation and the final exam assesses their overall learning progress. 
Course Convenor(s) Assistant Professor Christian Hofmann
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Thursdays: 9.00am to 12.00nn
Course Duration 10 August to 13 November 2020 
Modes of Assessment Class Participation - 20%; Research Paper (2000 words) - 40%
[Due: Date to be confirmed later (3.00pm)]
And a 2-Hr Take-Home Exam - 40%
[Release: Date to be confirmed later (9.00am); Due: Date to be confirmed later (11.00am)]
Preclusion(s) Nil
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
Course Description This course explores principles and rules relating to the exploration for, development and production of oil and gas (often described as "upstream oil and gas operations"). After an introduction to the geopolitics of oil and the history surrounding the oil and gas industry, the course commences with an examination of different arrangements governing the legal relationship between the petroleum producing states and international oil companies (IOCs). It then moves on to consider various commercial agreements governing the relationships between IOCs involved in upstream petroleum operations (such as joint operating and unitisation agreements) and the liability/risk allocation provisions commonly found in oilfield service contracts. It will conclude by examining key areas of regulatory law, notably the decommissioning of offshore installations. The course is international and comparative in its focus, drawing on the experience of many jurisdictions and legal systems at different points in time. 
Course Convenor(s) Visiting Professor Greg W. Gordon
Modular Credits 4
Class Dates Mondays (6.30pm to 9.30pm); Wednesdays (6.30pm to 9.30pm) & Fridays (2.30pm to 5.30pm)
Make-up class for Monday 10 August will be on Saturday, 15 August (1.00pm to 4.00pm)
Course Duration 10 August to 28 August 2020 
Modes of Assessment 6-hr Take Home Exam - 100%
[Release: Date to be confirmed later (3.00pm); Due: Date to be confirmed later (9.00pm)]
Preclusion(s) Nil
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
Course Description This course aims to equip students with the basic understanding of the law of arbitration to enable them to advise and represent parties in the arbitral process confidence. Legal concepts peculiar to arbitration viz. separability, arbitrability and kompetenz-kompetenz will considered together with the procedural laws on the conduct of the arbitral process, the making and the enforcement of awards. Students will examine the UNCITRAL Model Law and the New York Convention, 1958. This course is most suited for students with some knowledge of the law of commercial transactions, shipping, banking, international sale of goods or construction. 
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Gary Bell
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Mondays: 9.00am to 12.00nn
Course Duration 10 August to 13 November 2020 
Modes of Assessment Written Assignment (4000 words) - 20%;
Moots - 10%; Class Participation - 10% & 3-Hr Take Home Exam - 60%
[Release: Date to be confirmed (9.00am); Due: Date to be confirmed (12.00pm)]
Preclusion(s) Not open to LLM (IBL) students who will be reading this module in Semester 2 at ECUPL (Shanghai).
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
Course Description This course focuses on the nature of risks to foreign investment and the elimination of those risks through legal means. As a prelude, it discusses the different economic theories on foreign investment, the formation of foreign investment contracts and the methods of eliminating potential risks through contractual provisions. It then examines the different types of interferences with foreign investment and looks at the nature of the treaty protection available against such interference. It concludes by examining the different methods of dispute settlement available in the area. The techniques of arbitration of investment disputes available are fully explored.
Course Convenor(s) Emeritus Professor M Sornarajah
Modular Credits 4
Class Dates Mondays (6.30pm to 9.30pm); Wednesdays (6.30pm to 9.30pm) & Fridays (2.30pm to 5.30pm) 
Course Duration 31 August to 18 September 2020 
Modes of Assessment Class Participation - 10% & 6-hr Take Home Exam - 90%
[Release: Date to be confirmed (3.00pm); Due: Date to be confirmed (9.00pm)]
Preclusion(s) LL4178/LL5178/LL6178/LL4178V/LL5178V/LL6178V International Legal Protection of Investment Flows; LL4032V/LL5032V/LL6032V International Investment Law;
International Investment Law and Arbitration [Module code: LW.12001];
International Investment [Module code: LW.12137] under the NYU@NUS Summer Session.
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
Course Description This course is intended to introduce students to the practice and law relating to international projects and infrastructure. The various methods of procurement and the construction process involved will be reviewed in conjunction with standard forms that are used internationally - such as the FIDIC, JCT and NEC forms, among others. Familiar issues such as defects, time and cost overruns and the implications therefrom (and how these matters are dealt with in an international context) will also be covered. The course will provide students with an understanding of how international projects are procured, planned and administered as well as give an insight into how legal and commercial risks are identified, priced, managed and mitigated.

This course is intended to introduce students to the practice and law relating to international projects and infrastructure. The various methods of procurement and the construction process involved will be reviewed in conjunction with standard forms that are used internationally - such as the FIDIC, JCT and NEC forms, among others. Familiar issues such as defects, time and cost overruns and the implications therefrom (and how these matters are dealt with in an international context) will also be covered. The course will provide students with an understanding of how international projects are procured, planned and administered as well as give an insight into how legal and commercial risks are identified, priced, managed and mitigated.

To give the course a practical perspective, the course instructors will also share their own experience of the issues encountered in major projects they have worked on across various jurisdictions, such as China, India, Indonesia, Vietnam, and the Middle East. At a time when competition for construction projects has become increasingly global, and when regional and international law firms are involved to a greater extent in advising on such projects, this course should prove to be both practical and timely.
Course Convenor(s) Adjunct Associate Professor Nandakumar Ponniya
Course Convenor(s) Adjunct Associate Professor Edwin Lee Peng Khoon
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Thursdays: 6.30pm to 9.30pm
Course Duration 10 August to 13 November 2020 
Modes of Assessment Final Exam - 50%; Assignment (5000 words) - 40%
[Due: Date to be confirmed later] & Class Participation - 10%
Preclusion(s) Nil
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
Course Description This module examines the treaties used by States to protect the interests of their investors when making investments abroad and to attract foreign investment into host economies. It will pay particular attention to investor-State arbitration under investment treaties, which is increasingly becoming widespread in Asia and a growing part of international legal practice. It will examine not only the legal and theoretical underpinnings of these treaties and this form of dispute settlement, but also their practical application to concrete cases and their utility as a tool of government policy. 
Course Convenor(s) Research Associate Professor (Centre for International Law) N Jansen Calamita
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Thursdays: 3.00pm to 6.00pm
Course Duration 10 August to 13 November 2020 
Modes of Assessment Class Participation - 10%; Written Assignment - 25% 6-hr Take Home Exam - 65%
[Release: Date to be confirmed later (9.00am); Due: Date to be confirmed later (3.00pm)]
Preclusion(s) Must not have taken a substantially similar course. Not open to students who have taken/taking
(1) LL4032/LL5032/LL6032; LL4032V/LL5032V/LL6032V International Investment Law;
(2) LL4078/LL5078/LL6078; LL4078V/LL5078V/LL6078V Law & Practice of Investment Treaty Arbitration.
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
Course Description This module aims to explore the interaction between legal institutions and economic/business development in Greater China (i.e. China, Taiwan, HK), with focus on China. How has China been able to offset institutional weaknesses at home while achieving impressive economic results worldwide? Have China's experiences indicated an unorthodox model as captured in the term "Beijing Consensus"? To what extent is this model different from East Asian models and conventional thinking in economic growth? This course reviews theories about market development in the context of Greater China, including securities, corporate regulations, capital markets, property, sovereign wealth funds, foreign investment, and anti-corruption etc. 
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Chen Weitseng
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Fridays (9.00am to 12.00nn)
Course Duration 14 August to 13 November 2020 
Modes of Assessment Reaction paper/class participation - 20%6-hr Take Home Exam - 80% [Release: Fri, 20 Nov 2020 (9am); Due: Fri, 20 Nov 2020 (3pm)]
Preclusion(s) NIL
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
Course Description This course deals with the principles and doctrines underpinning the formation and validity of insurance policies. It seeks to help students appreciate concepts of risk management, the protection of commercial businesses assets and the protection of individual lives against unforeseen contingencies and losses that may arise. Topics include the nature of general insurance contracts, formation of insurance contracts, peculiar insurance doctrines such as non disclosure, warranties and subrogation, claims procedure, doctrine of indemnity and measuring your losses, and third party rights. The techniques of successfully claiming under the policy and resisting the insurer's wrongful denial of claims will be covered.
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Yeo Hwee Ying
Modular Credits 8
Class Dates Mondays: 9.00am to 12.00nn & Thursdays: 12.00nn to 3.00pm
Course Duration 10 August to 13 November 2020 
Modes of Assessment Final Exam - 60%; Assignment & Class Participation - 40%
Preclusion(s) Nil
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
Course Description The course will begin with an evaluation of the business rationale for M&A and a discussion of the various types of transactions and related terminology. The regulatory issues surrounding these transactions will be analysed through an examination of the applicable laws and regulations. While the law in Singapore would be considered as the frame of reference, the course will contain an international comparative perspective including comparisons with the position in the U.K. and the U.S. While corporate and securities law issues form the thrust, incidental reference will be made to accounting, tax and competition law considerations. Finally, the transactional perspective will consider various structuring matters, planning aspects, transaction costs and impact on various stakeholders. 
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Umakanth Varottil
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Fridays: 9.00am to 12.00nn
Course Duration 10 August to 13 November 2020 
Modes of Assessment Final Exam - 70%; Written Assignment (individual: 2000 words; pair: 4000 words) - 20%
[Due: Date to be confirmed later , (11.59pm)] & Class Participation -10%
Preclusion(s) Must not have taken a substantially similar course.
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
Course Description It introduces participants to major income tax issues faced by businesses operating in a global economy. These issues include causes of multiple taxation, solutions to avoid multiple taxation, the effectiveness of Double Taxation Agreements (DTAs) and the abuse of DTAs. In particular, issues such as tax arbitrage, tax havens, choice of foreign vehicle, corporate finance options and repatriation of income and capital will be discussed. Tax issues arising from outbound and inbound investments will also be covered. Last, the course will identify global tax trends arising from increased mobility of capital, technological advancements as well as demographics.
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Phua Lye Huat, Stephen
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Wednesdays: 9.00am to 12.00nn
Course Duration 10 August to 13 November 2020 
Modes of Assessment Class participation, presentation and LumiNUS contributions: 10%; MCQ test
[Date to be confirmed later]:
20%; Individually supervised Research Paper (5000 words): 70% [Due: Date to be confirmed later]
Preclusion(s) Nil
Prerequisite(s) (a) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
(b) Candidates must have completed at least a module in company law at the undergraduate or postgraduate level.  Alternatively, any candidate who has practiced as a tax professional for at least 1 year may enrol.
Course Description The legal framework for international trade consists of four interlocking sets of contractual relationship: the underlying sale contract whereby goods or services are sold internationally; a contract for the international carriage of goods by land, sea or air; insurance policies covering loss of, or damage to, the goods; and the international banking contracts between the sale parties and banks financing the transaction. This module focuses on the financing aspect of international trade, although a key theme of the course is that this aspect cannot be seen in isolation from the other sale, carriage and insurance aspects of trade operations. This module will examine the various mechanisms that are used to effect payment pursuant to the terms of the sale contract and that are used to incentivise performance of that agreement. This module will focus in particular on the documentary letter of credit as the principal means of financing international sales, although other financing techniques will also be considered. 
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Paul Myburgh
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Mondays: 3.00pm to 6.00pm
Course Duration 10 August to 13 November 2020 
Modes of Assessment Class Participation – 10%; Research Paper (2500 words) - 20%
[Topic/s will be released in Date to be confirmed provisionally due on Date to be confirmed]
And a 6-hr Take Home Exam - 70%
[Release: Date to be confirmed later (9.00am); Due: Date to be confirmed later (3.00pm)]
Preclusion(s) LL4322/LL5322/LL6322/LLD5322 Trade Finance Law
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
Course Description The phenomenon of globalization over the last 50 years has been fuelled not just by technological innovation but also legal innovation. However, in 2016, the vote for Brexit in the UK and the election of Mr Donald Trump as the US President, has challenged the movement towards economic integration. Indeed, one of President Trump's first Executive Orders was to cancel the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP) that the previous Obama Administration had worked on for 5 years. It is thus, even more important than ever before to understand and appreciate the existing rules so as to promote the rule of law in what may be an increasingly protectionist environment.

The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and its successor institution, the World Trade Organization (WTO) have attempted to create a system where the rules for the trade in goods and services are clearer and fairer. The legal innovations found in the GATT and subsequent WTO Agreements have also influenced Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) like the TPP and even International Investment Agreements (IIAs).

Fundamental to the WTO disciplines is the principle of non-discrimination. The problem often is, however, what constitutes discrimination, whether such discrimination can be justified and whether non-economic factors such as health and the environment or other public policy considerations can modify the rules. This tension in World Trade Law is a theme in both the disciplines for trade in goods and services as well as the agreements on standards like the TBT and SPS as well as even the trade remedies rules such as Safeguards, Subsidies and Anti-Dumping. 
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Michael Ewing-Chow
Modular Credits 8
Class Dates Tuesdays: 3.00pm to 6.00pm & Thursdays: 3.00pm to 6.00pm
Course Duration 10 August to 13 November 2020 
Modes of Assessment Class Participation - 10%; Written Assignment - 10% & 6-Hr Take Home Exam: 80%
[Release: Date to be confirmed later (9.00am); Due: Date to be confirmed later (3.00pm)]
Preclusion(s) Not opened to student who have taken or are taking
(1) World Trade Law (4MC) [LL4060/LL5060/LL6060];
(2) World Trade Law I [LL4199A/LL5199A/LL6199A];
(3) World Trade Law II [LL4199B/LL5199B/LL6199B].
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.


Semester Two

Electives
Course Description ASEAN leaders agreed to create a single market - the ASEAN Economic Community - by 2015 and aim for deeper integration by 2025. Yet, due to sovereignty concerns, ASEAN leaders did not create a single supranational authority to regulate this market. Issues further arise from politics, social values and technology and from the Covid-19 pandemic and its trade and economic impacts. This course examines how ASEAN member states and institutions are filling in the vacuum through formal and informal means. Students will understand how regional policymaking affects domestic laws and policies within ASEAN.
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Tay Seong Chee, Simon
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Mondays: 3.00pm - 6.00pm
Course Duration 11 January to 16 April 2021
Modes of Assessment Class participation - 15%; Short Paper (3000 words) and presentation by video - 35% [Held in Week 4];
6-Hr Take Home Exam - 50%, Release: Monday, 19 April 2021 (3.00pm); Due: Monday, 19 April 2021 (9.00pm)
Preclusion(s) NIL
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 36 points
Course Description This module introduces students to the law governing various facets of modern banking. Three main areas will be covered: bank regulation, the principles governing the bank-customer relationship and payment. The topic of payment will cover the following payment methods: money, cheques, funds transfers and cards. Cautionary note for students from Civil Law Jurisdiction: a background knowledge of common law subjects is assumed, including contract, tort, equity, and company law.
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Sandra Annette Booysen
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Tuesdays: 12.00pm to 3.00pm
Course Duration 11 January to 16 April 2021
Modes of Assessment [LLB] Class Performance - 10%; Written Assignment (2000 words), Due: Week 9 - Fri (5pm) - 20% & Final Exam - 70%
[LLM] Class Performance -10%; Written Assignment (2000 words) Due: Week 9 - Fri (5pm) - 30% & Final Exam - 60%
Preclusion(s) NIL
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 36 points
Course Description To provide law students who intend to read commercial law electives with a foundation in accounting, finance and other related business concepts. It covers topics such as interpretation and analysis of standard financial statements, the types of players and instruments in the financial markets and the basic framework of a business investment market. The course will employ a hypothetical simulation where lawyers advise on several proposals involving the acquisition and disposal of assets by a client. The issues covered in the hypothetical will include asset valuation models, financing options and techniques, and compliance with accounting and regulatory frameworks.
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Phua Lye Huat, Stephen
Adjunct Associate Professor Leong Chan Foo, James
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Mondays: 3.00pm to 6.00pm
Course Duration 11 January to 16 April 2021 
Modes of Assessment Tutorial: 10%; Quiz 1: 15%; Quiz 2: 20%; Individual Test: 20%; Research Project: 35%
Preclusion(s) Not opened to students who have taken or are taking Financial Accounting
(1) FNA1002;
(2) FNA1002E;
(3) FNA1002X;
(4) ACC1002X; ACC1002X NOTE:The following students are not permitted to enrol in this module: those who have completed, or who intend in the current or a future semester to subscribe for, modules relating to finance or accounting offered in other universities or faculties in NUS (2) those who are graduates of, or are currently enrolled in other programmes leading to professional qualifications in, accountancy or finance.
Prerequisite(s) (a) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
(b) Company Law [LLB2008/LC2008] or its equivalent in a common law jurisdiction (may be taken concurrently).
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 36 points
Course Description This course focuses on laws governing banks and the other financial intermediaries in China, reflecting the game between regulation and financial innovation. It will be divided into three parts: the first and also the most the essential one will cover the legal requirements of operation and business of traditional commercial banks; the second one will go through the corporate governance of banks, problem bank resolution and currency issues; the last part will discuss the legal issues of new financial products and non-bank financial institutions. This course focuses on the emerging issues in China of that subject, and also pay particular attention to recent legislative reform efforts in China on banking and non-bank financial institutions and will consider both the developments and innovation in scholarship and teaching of financial law since 2008.
Course Convenor(s) Visiting Professor Gao Simin
Modular Credits 4
Class Dates Mondays (6.30pm to 9.30pm); Wednesdays (6.30pm to 9.30pm) & Fridays (2.30pm to 5.30pm)
*Make-up for 12 February (Chinese New Year) will be held on Saturday, 6 February (1.00pm to 4.00pm)
Course Duration 1 February to 19 February 2021
Modes of Assessment Research Paper - 100%, Due: Friday, 26 March 2021 (9.00pm)
Preclusion(s) LL4306/LL5306/LL6306;LL4306V/LL5306V/LL6306V Banking Law and Financial Regulation in China
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 27 points
Course Description This course will introduce students to the fundamental legal concepts and principles relating to Chinese corporate and securities law. The principal objective of this course is to provide an understanding of the various legal and practical issues involved in doing business and obtaining financing in China. Major topics to be covered include: types of business vehicles, formation of companies, corporate governance, IPOs, corporate finance, private equity and venture capital, stock market, as well as securities regulation in China. The module will also draw on relevant comparative perspectives from major jurisdictions.
Course Convenor(s) Assistant Professor Lin Lin
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Mondays: 9.00am to 12.00pm
Course Duration 11 January to 16 April 2021
Modes of Assessment Class Presentation and Essay - 40% &
Take Home Exam - 60%, Release: Monday, 12 April 2021 (9.00am);
Due: Monday, 12 April 2021 (3.00pm)
Preclusion(s) Must not have taken a substantially similar course.
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 36 points
Course Description This course explores Thai contract law which is a product of civil law traditions and a cornerstone of Thai private law. It covers major areas of contract law from the beginning to the end of a contract, i.e. contract formation, validity, interpretation, breach of contract, and ending and changing a contract. Course participants will be encouraged to make comparisons between Thai and Singapore contract laws on certain issues.
Course Convenor(s) Visiting Professor Munin Pongsapan
Modular Credits 4
Class Dates Mondays (6.30pm to 9.30pm); Wednesdays (6.30pm to 9.30pm) & Fridays (2.30pm to 5.30pm)
Course Duration 11 January to 29 January 2021
Modes of Assessment Class Participation - 20% & 6-Hr Take Home Exam - 80%, Release: Friday, 5 March 2021 (3.00pm);
Due: Friday, 5 March 2021 (9.00pm)
Preclusion(s) LL4388V/LL5388V/LL6388V Comparative Civil Law: Thai Contract Law
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 27 points
Course Description This course examines the core legal characteristics of the corporate form across major jurisdictions. It draws on corporate law developments in the United States, United Kingdom, Singapore, Japan, Germany, and France to explain the common agency problems that are inherent in the corporate form and compares the legal strategies that each jurisdiction uses to solve these common problems. It also examines several of the most significant topics and policy debates in the burgeoning area of comparative corporate law and governance - with an emphasis on Asia. This course concludes with a discussion of how the comparative lessons learned may illuminate some of the most interesting and pressing issues facing corporate law and governance in Asia. The major topics covered in this course are: the universal corporate form; the ubiquitous problem of agency costs; the structural (in)efficiency of corporate boards; the delusion of corporate democracy; the myth of the independent director; the "stick" of shareholder litigation and "carrot" of executive compensation; regulating related party transactions and hostile takeovers; and, Asian corporate law and governance in a comparative context.
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Daniel William Puchniak
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Thursdays: 12.00pm to 3.00pm
Course Duration 11 January to 16 April 2021
Modes of Assessment Class group reflection exercise (including a group presentation and a 2500 word paper) - 20%;
Class participation - 20% & Final Exam - 60%
Preclusion(s) NIL
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent. Previously completed a course in Company Law.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 36 points
Course Description This course will focus in detail on the instances in which resort to conflict of laws is necessary in the international arbitration context. The objective of this course is to allow participants to realise on how many occasions both State courts and arbitrators will need to report a conflict of laws analysis despite the claim that conflict of laws issues are not relevant in the international commercial arbitration context. Participants will first be taught to identify what conflict of laws rules may apply and will then be given hypothetical cases and will be asked to critically examine whether a solution can be found that does not require a conflict of laws approach.
Course Convenor(s) Visiting Professor Franco Ferrari
Modular Credits 4
Class Dates Mondays (6.30pm to 9.30pm); Wednesdays (6.30pm to 9.30pm) & Fridays (2.30pm to 5.30pm)
Course Duration 11 January to 29 January 2021
Modes of Assessment Research Paper - 100%, Due: Friday, 5 March 2021 (9.00pm)
Preclusion(s) LL4295V/LL5295V/LL6295V Conflict of Laws in Int'l Commercial Arbitration
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Curriculum or its equivalent.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 27 points
Course Description The objective of this course is to introduce students to the legal principles that form the foundation of construction law and to the common practical problems that arise in this field. Topics will include: (a) general principles of construction law, including completion, variations, defects, retention and certification; (b) basic provisions of construction contracts; (c) claims procedure & dispute resolution, including adjudication proceedings; and (d) relevant provisions of standard form building contracts. This course will be of interest to students interested in construction practice or being exposed to a practical approach to resolving construction-related issues that arise in the local industry.
Course Convenor(s) Adjunct Professor Christopher Chuah Chee Kian
Adjunct Associate Professor Ian De Vaz
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Tuesdays: 6.30pm to 9.30pm
Course Duration 11 January to 16 April 2021
Modes of Assessment Final Exam - 70%; Class Presentation (including submission of presentation papers) - 30%
Preclusion(s) NIL
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 36 points
Course Description This course examines why and how six corporate mechanisms - sustainability reporting; board gender diversity; constituency directors; stewardship codes; directors' duties; and liability on companies, shareholders and directors - have been or can be used to promote corporate social responsibility in the Asian and Anglo-American jurisdictions. It equips students with practical skillsets on how to advise clients on CSR issues and provides them with a strong foundation to critically engage with sustainability matters that will be important to them in practice.
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Lim Wee Kuan, Ernest
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Fridays: 9.00am to 12.00pm
Course Duration 11 January to 16 April 2021
Modes of Assessment Class Participation - 20%; Group Presentation - 30% & Essay - 50%, Due: Friday, 16 April 2021 (9.00am)
Preclusion(s) NIL
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 36 points
Course Description The first one-third of the course will be devoted to lectures that would provide students with the necessary foundation on tax issues faced by corporations. The remaining two-thirds of the module will take the form of seminars cum presentations focusing on detailed studies or case studies of major corporate tax issues. These might also include hypotheticals that raise selected tax issues that range from incorporation to winding up. A study of these issues would entail an evaluation of solutions to tax issues arising from IPOs, mergers and acquisitions, disposal of assets, group losses, use of hybrid financial instruments, asset financing techniques, creation and exploitation of IP rights, corporate profits and distributions, assignments of economic interests, corporate tax planning pitfalls and liquidation.
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Phua Lye Huat, Stephen
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Tuesdays: 9.00am to 12.00pm
Course Duration  
Modes of Assessment 11 January to 16 April 2021
Preclusion(s) NIL
Prerequisite(s) (a) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent. (b) Company Law or its equivalent in a common law jurisdiction (may be taken concurrently). (c) Tax Planning & Policy; Students must have completed and passed a module on basic tax planning law at the undergraduate or postgraduate levels.
Candidates who do not satisfy any of the above may seek approval of the course convenor by submitting documentary evidence to support the fulfilment of the equivalents of (a), (b) or (c).
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 36 points
Course Description The objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of domestic and international sale of goods under the Singapore law. With regard to domestic sales, the course will focus on the Sale of Goods Act. Topics to be studied will include the essential elements of the contract of sale; the implied conditions of title, description, fitness and quality; delivery and payment, acceptance and termination, and the available remedies. With particular reference to a seller's delivery obligations, the course will also cover substantial aspects of the international sale of goods under the common law, such as FOB and CIF contracts and documentary sales. This course will be of interest to students intending to enter commercial practice.
Course Convenor(s) Professor Michael Bridge
Modular Credits 4
Class Dates 1 February to 19 February 2021
Course Duration Mondays (6.30pm to 9.30pm); Wednesdays (6.30pm to 9.30pm) & Fridays (2.30pm to 5.30pm)
*Make-up for 12 February (Chinese New Year) will be held on Saturday, 6 February (1.00pm to 4.00pm)
Modes of Assessment Class Participation - 10%; 6-Hr Take Home Exam - 90%, Release: Friday, 26 March 2021 (3.00pm);
Due: Friday, 26 March 2021 (9.00pm)
Preclusion(s) NIL
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 27 points
Course Description In this course, we will look at the way economists analyze legal problems and how economics has contributed to our understanding of the legal system. In order to do that, we will want to get a firm grounding on what an economist's lens looks like. We will run through the main principles of economic thought. After this introduction to economic thinking, we will look at how the principles of economics are applied in specific legal contexts. For these basic applications, we shall take examples from four courses (Property, Contracts, Torts, Criminal Law) to see how an economist might approach these problems. Following on from these basic applications, we will look at various extensions to the basic model and special topics.
Course Convenor(s) Visiting Associate Professor Anthony J Casey
Modular Credits 4
Class Dates Mondays (6.30pm to 9.30pm); Wednesdays (6.30pm to 9.30pm) & Fridays (2.30pm to 5.30pm)
Course Duration 11 January to 29 January 2021
Modes of Assessment 6-Hr Take Home Exam - 100%, Release: Friday, 5 March 2021 (3.00pm);
Due: Friday, 5 March 2021 (9.00pm)
Preclusion(s) Students who have done Economic Analysis of Law are precluded.
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 27 points
Course Description The course includes various aspects of financial regulation. The focus is on the regulation of banks and the role of central banks. Other forms of regulation of financial intermediaries and financial markets are discussed as well, but in less detail. Since the focus is on banks, it is important for students to understand what distinguishes them from other providers of financial services and how the regulatory approaches differ. The part on the regulation of banks covers the requirements for their authorization, the principles of prudential regulation and rescue concepts in situations of insolvency and default. These aspects are discussed from a comparative perspective with the Basel requirements at the core of the discussion, complemented by the implementing norms in important jurisdictions, above all in Singapore. Around the globe, national legislators and regulators have implemented the FSB Key Attributes for the resolution and restructuring of financial institutions, and the course looks at Singapore's and Hong Kong's rules in detail. The roles of central banks form a further core part of the course. Their tasks and objectives are studied from a comparative perspective. Their essential role in crisis management, their co-operation with supervisory agencies and their monetary policy are the main components of this part of the course. Pre-recorded videos and readings are the homework components preparing students for in-class discussions. In addition, students work in small groups on supervised research and present their results to the rest of the course. A short in-class quiz tests students' understanding of bank regulation and the final exam assesses their overall learning progress.
Course Convenor(s) Assistant Professor Christian Hofmann
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Fridays: 9.00am to 12.00pm
Course Duration 11 January to 16 April 2021
Modes of Assessment Class Presentation (in small groups) - 25% and
6-Hr Take-Home Exam - 75%, Release: Friday, 16 April 2021 (9.00am);
Due: Friday, 16 April 2021 (3.00pm)
Preclusion(s) Nil
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 36 points
Course Description This course aims to introduce to students topical and current issues of interest in the regulation of international financial markets, with a focus on global capital and investment markets. The regulation of investment firms and funds reached a new high with mainly European leadership in regulatory standards and many of these are influential globally. We aim to cover theoretical foundations in regulation, so that students can grasp the law and economic theories and public policy underpinnings of financial regulation, and specific topics that relate to securities and investment regulation. The approach to specific topics would be grounded in theoretical and policy understanding, in order to appreciate the high key highlights of regulatory duties, compliance implications and enforcement.
Course Convenor(s) Visiting Professor Chiu Hse-Yu, Iris
Modular Credits 4
Class Dates Mondays (6.30pm to 9.30pm); Wednesdays (6.30pm to 9.30pm) & Fridays (2.30pm to 5.30pm)
*Make-up for 12 February (Chinese New Year) will be held on Saturday, 6 February (1.00pm to 4.00pm)
Course Duration 1 February to 19 February 2021
Modes of Assessment Class Participation - 20%; Assignment - 20%; Research Paper (should not exceed 5000 words in total excluding footnotes) - 60%,
Due: Friday, 26 March 2021 (9.00pm)
Preclusion(s) LL4302V/LL5302V/LL6302V Regulation of Investment Markets
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 27 points
Course Description This course deals with the principles and doctrines underpinning the formation and validity of insurance policies. It seeks to help students appreciate concepts of risk management, the protection of commercial businesses assets and the protection of individual lives against unforeseen contingencies and losses that may arise. Topics include the nature of general insurance contracts, formation of insurance contracts, peculiar insurance doctrines such as non disclosure, warranties and subrogation, claims procedure, doctrine of indemnity and measuring your losses, and third party rights. The techniques of successfully claiming under the policy and resisting the insurer's wrongful denial of claims will be covered.
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Yeo Hwee Ying
Modular Credits 8
Class Dates Mondays: 3.00pm to 6.00 and Thursdays: 12.00pm to 3.00pm
Course Duration 11 January to 16 April 2021
Modes of Assessment Assignment & Class Participation - 40%; Final Exam - 60%
Preclusion(s) Nil
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent. In particular, must have completed the equivalent of NUS Contract Law (common law jurisdiction).
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 72 points
Course Description This course will provide a practitioner's perspective on the bread and butter of any transactional practice: mergers and acquisitions (M&A) of non-listed, private companies. It will deal with the structuring of an M&A transaction (the what and why) and provide an overview of the legal basis underlying aspects of documentation (the why and how of documentation).
Many new graduates seem to be unable to see the wood for the trees. They arrive as trainees, with a reasonable grounding in the law, but an inability to apply it to real life situations. The practicalities elude them and they seem to want to follow templates without much understanding of the transaction. This course will attempt to give them a working knowledge of the issues to be considered in structuring a transaction. It will also cover the main features of standard documentation (bearing in mind that there is a discernible industry-standard set of documentation in common law countries) to explain why documents are drafted the way they are.
Course Convenor(s) Adjunct Associate Professor Rachel Tan
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Wednesdays: 9.00am to 12.00pm
Course Duration 11 January to 16 April 2021
Modes of Assessment Class Participation - 25%; Group Presentation - 25%; Final Exam - 50%
Preclusion(s) (1) LL4327/LL5327/LL6327 Mergers and Acquisitions: A Practitioner's Perspective;
(2) LL4074/LL5074/LL6074; LL4074V/LL5074V/LL6074V Mergers & Acquisitions (M&A);
(3) LL4223/LL5223/LL6223; LL4233V/LL5223V/LL6223V Cross Border Mergers
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent. Contracts, Property, Equity & Trusts and Company Law. An ability to engage in rapid discussion and Q &A in English. Please take note that the pace of the class is fast and content is heavy. Students who do not come from a common law background may have difficulty with certain underlying concepts.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 36 points
Course Description Since Singapore's independence in 1965, its economic development has been remarkable. Singapore's unique system of corporate governance is one of the keys to its economic success. This course will begin by providing a historical and comparative overview of Singapore's system of corporate governance. It will then undertake an in-depth and comparative analysis of the core features of Singapore corporate governance, highlighting aspects which make it unique. The course will then examine the latest developments in Singapore corporate governance, with an emphasis on analysing the details, policy rationale, and implications of recent reforms. The course will conclude by considering what the future may hold for Singapore’s system of corporate governance and what other jurisdictions may learn from it.
Course Convenor(s) Associate Professor Daniel William Puchniak
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Mondays: 12.00pm to 3.00pm
Course Duration 11 January to 16 April 2021
Modes of Assessment Class group reflection exercise (including a group presentation and a 2500 word paper) - 20%; Class Participation - 20% & Final Exam - 60%
Preclusion(s) NIL
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent. Previously completed a course in Company Law.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 36 points
Course Description In today's global digital world, national tax systems face new challenges. Governments large and small cooperate in tax enforcement including through strengthened anti-abuse rules, yet tax competition continues. Uncertainty, complexity and risk have increased for taxpayers ranging from individuals to multinational enterprises. Recent developments in the OECD Inclusive Framework and other forums may lead to significant new global tax rules, but an agreed outcome is far from certain. This course explores the latest trends and issues in personal and corporate income tax and Goods and Services Tax that address digital or cross-border services or employment, consumption, and investment.
Course Convenor(s) Visiting Professor Miranda Stewart
Modular Credits 4
Class Dates Mondays (6.30pm to 9.30pm); Wednesdays (6.30pm to 9.30pm) & Fridays (2.30pm to 5.30pm)
No lesson on 3, 5 & 12 February
*Make-up on Wednesday, 10 & 17 February (1.00pm to 4.00pm) & on Saturday, 20 February (1.00pm to 4.00pm)
Course Duration 1 February to 20 February 2021
Modes of Assessment Class Participation - 10%; Assignment (1000 words) - 20% & Research Paper (4000 words) - 70%
Due: Friday, 26 March 2021 (9.00pm)
Preclusion(s) LL4385V/LL5385V/LL6385V Taxation Law & the Global Digital Economy
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent. Previously completed a course in Company Law.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 27 points
Course Description This course will be useful for those who want to practise corporate or tax law.
Topics covered include, the Singapore corporate tax, GST and stamp duty implications of (a) related party transactions; (b) restructurings and; (c) M&As
- structuring techniques to increase tax efficiency in each of these situations
- selected US corporate tax rules (since the tax consequences of a foreign country will have to be analysed)
- how structuring strategies may be challenged with rules/proposed rules addressing treaty shopping, debt-equity and entity classification hybridity, and other tax arbitrage opportunities.
Course Convenor(s) Mr Justin Jerzy Tan
Modular Credits 5
Class Dates Tuesdays: 3.00pm to 6.00pm
Course Duration 11 January to 16 April 2021
Modes of Assessment Assignment (at least 2000 words, take home) - 25%;
Final Exam (2hrs, sit-down open book, question type: MCQ, True/False and short-answer) - 75%
Preclusion(s) LL4035/LL5035/LL6035/LC5035/LC5035A/LC5035B/;
LL4035V/LL5035V/LL6035V Taxation Issues in Cross-Border Transactions;
LL4342/LL5342/LL6342 Taxation of Cross-Border Commercial Transactions
Prerequisite(s) NUS Compulsory Core Law Curriculum or equivalent.
SILE Public CPD Points Up to 36 points



Course Fees

Students will be required to pay SGD5,778.00 (inclusive of 7% GST) per 4 MC or 5MC module and will be billed before the start of each semester.

A 8 MC module costs twice the fee of a 4 MC or 5 MC module.

The total programme fee for 3 modules (assuming student passes all 3 modules and obtains the required modular credits for graduation) is SGD17,334 (inclusive of 7% GST).

A Student Services Fee of SGD25.23 (inclusive of 7% GST) is also applicable each semester.

 

Application

The following are the two application periods for the respective semesters:

Intake Period

Application Period

AY2020/21 Semester One (commencing Aug/Sep)

1 to 31 May 2020

AY2020/21 Semester Two (commencing Jan/Feb)

1 to 31 October 2020


This online application will take you approximately 15 mins to complete. Before you start, you should have details of your academic qualifications and employment and the PDF version of the following required documents at hand:

» A personal statement on why you wish to enroll in this programme, the nature of your work and such other information that you would like us to consider (not more than 1 page)
» Curriculum Vitae
» Scanned copy of NRIC/FIN/Passport(foreigner)
» Scanned copy of your LLB Degree Certificate
» Scanned copies of your LLB Transcripts
» Any other supporting documents (e.g. TOEFL/IELTS results), if applicable

Any omission of supporting documents or information required in the Online Application Form will render the application void. All supporting documents, if not in English, must be accompanied by copies of the English translated version.

You will need to register for an account in the NUS Online Application Portal after selecting “Executive / Graduate Certificate (GC) Programmes”.


Click HERE to apply.
The Application Portal will be open from 1 October 2020.


Application Deadline

31 October 2020, Saturday


Frequently Asked Questions

Click HERE to view the FAQs relating to this programme.


SILE-CPD Points

Participants who wish to obtain CPD Points are reminded that they must comply strictly with the Attendance Policy set out in the CPD Guidelines. For this activity, this includes logging in at the start of the webinar and logging out at the conclusion of the webinar on each day of the activity, and not being away from any part of the webinar for more than 15 minutes on each day of the activity. Participants who do not comply with the Attendance Policy on any particular day of the activity will not be able to obtain CPD Points for that day of the activity.

Please refer to http://www.sileCPDcentre.sg for more information.

Public CPD Points : Up to 72 points for 8 Modular Credits (Semester Course)
Up to 36 points for 5 Modular Credits (Semester Course)
Up to 27 points for 4 Modular Credits (Intensive Course)
Practice Area Code : Others/Multi-disciplinary
Training Level: : Intermediate



top